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Chapter 10: With Trust, It Is Always Spring

The man who has attained truth should also take care that his life radiates godliness, goodness. It may not be in tune with the morality of the society - it cannot be, because that morality is created by blind, unconscious people, just as a convention. For the man of truth it is not convention, it is simply his life. In utter nudity, he should make his life available to existence, to people, so that the ordinary morality of convention slowly, slowly changes into a real and authentic morality of a man who knows the truth.

The man of truth should not look at poetry and music and dance as just entertainment for ordinary people. He should make it a point, because he has risen to a height from where he can see beauty in its absolute glory. He can contribute many riches to existence : Each of his words can be a poem in itself, each of his silences can become celestial music, each of his gestures can indicate towards the most beautiful phenomenon, grace.

But this has not been so up to now - they have all followed their paths separately. I want my people to seek the truth, because by seeking it the other two will become available on their own accord.

But remember, when you have experienced truth don’t forget that it is part of your compassion to give humanity new dreams of goodness, new visions of morality, ethics, which are not of the marketplace, which are not only conventions. And he should not forget that his truth is so deep inside him that the unconscious people will not be able to have a taste of it - he should create beauty in all possible dimensions.

Once in a while it has been done.

For example, when the Taj Mahal was created.it was not the work of great architects, but it is the most beautiful architecture in existence. Shah Jehan, the emperor who was creating it as a memorial grave for his beautiful wife, Mumtaz Mahal - hence the name Taj Mahal - searched for years for Sufi mystics, who have no concern for beauty. He asked the Sufi mystics, “Although it is something lower, and you are not interested in it - and why should one be? - just for my sake, you design the Taj Mahal. The architects will make it, but the design should come from those who have known beauty in its fullness, from a height.”

George Gurdjieff used to say that there are two kinds of art. One is subjective art - ninety-nine percent of art in the world is subjective: you are simply pouring your feelings, your desires, your longings, your dreams, into whatever you are making.

But once in a while there is objective art - only one percent. What he calls objective art is art created by those who were not artists, who were realized people. They created music to help meditation - it was not for entertainment. They created poetry to convey that which cannot be conveyed by prose. They sang, they danced, to give you just a glimpse of their ecstasy, of their inner dance, of their joy, their blissfulness.

In India, there are many places which have objective art. Even Gurdjieff had to mention them, although he was in the West; he was born in the Caucasus, but when he was talking about objective art, he had to fall upon India.

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