Quantcast

Read Book

OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   Zen: The Quantum Leap from Mind to No-Mind
1 2 3 4 5 > »
 

Chapter 7: One Cannot Have a Problem

After a lecture to the monks one morning,
Yakusan was approached by a monk, who said,
“I have a problem. Will you solve it for me?”
“I will solve it at the next lecture,” Yakusan answered.
That evening, when all the monks had gathered in the hall,
Yakusan called out loudly,
“The monk who told me this morning he had a problem,
come up here immediately!”
As soon as the monk stepped forward
to stand in front of the audience,
the master left his seat and roughly took hold of the monk.
“Look!” he said. “This fellow has a problem!”
He then pushed the monk aside
and returned to his room
without giving the evening lecture.

When Kyozan was living at Kannon Temple,
he put up a notice-board on which it said,
“No questions while sutras are being read!”
A monk came to visit the master,
and just at that time Kyozan was reading the sutra,
so the monk stood beside him until Kyozan
had finished reading and rolled up the sutra.
Kyozan said, “Do you understand?”
The monk replied, “I was not reading the sutra
- how could I understand it?”
Kyozan said, “You will understand it later.”
The monk afterwards brought the matter up to Gonto, who said,
“That old roshi! What I think is that, properly speaking,
those old scraps of paper that were buried are still with us.”

Zen is not in the anecdotes. It is just like a fragrance around a roseflower: you cannot catch hold of it, but you can smell it. Zen needs sensitivity - not intellectual, not of the mind, but of your total being.

These anecdotes from different angles point to the same thing.

After a lecture to the monks one morning,
Yakusan was approached by a monk, who said,
“I have a problem. Will you solve it for me?”

In the first place, nobody can solve anybody else’s problem. Deep down you don’t have a problem at all, because you are the answer. How can you have a problem? The mind is full of problems, but the mind is not your reality.

Yakusan must have been a very compassionate master. He said:

“I will solve it at the next lecture.”

He is giving time to the monk to see the point, because the next lecture means tomorrow, means that which never comes. “Drop the problem here! Don’t wait for the answer to come from outside sometime in the future.”

But Yakusan is known to be very kind. He said:

“I will solve it at the next lecture,” Yakusan answered.
That evening, when all the monks had gathered in the hall,
Yakusan called out loudly,
“The monk who told me this morning he had a problem,
come up here immediately!”
As soon as the monk stepped forward
to stand in front of the audience,
the master left his seat and roughly took hold of the monk.
“Look!” he said. “This fellow has a problem!”
He then pushed the monk aside
and returned to his room
without giving the evening lecture.

1 2 3 4 5 > »