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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   Nirvana: The Last Nightmare
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Chapter 2: The Ultimate Nightmare

When you can see the total futility of desire, will you ask how to drop it? If you see the total futility of it, it drops by itself.

You go on asking how, because you still want to cling. You still want to postpone it. You still think there must be something in it: “Maybe I am missing, maybe I am not making right efforts, maybe I am not moving in the right direction - but there is something.” You are still hoping.

When you look into the nature of desire, you will understand that it is like a horizon. It appears far away - there. Go, move - it moves with you. When you reach the point where you were thinking that the earth meets the sky, it is not meeting there. Again, at the same farther distance, the horizon exists. Again move - the horizon moves with you. The distance between you and the horizon remains constantly the same.

If you look into desire, it is so simple to see. If you meditate on desire, this is a fact; this is not a theory about desire.

You have ten thousand rupees. The mind asks for twenty thousand rupees. The mind says: “Unless you have twenty thousand rupees, how can you live happily? It is impossible.” You can get twenty thousand rupees. You will waste a long time for it; one day you will get it. By the time you have got twenty thousand rupees, the desire has gone further away. Now it asks for forty thousand rupees.

By the time you attain to twenty thousand rupees, you have become more addicted to comforts; now more comforts are needed. Now the old house looks small, the old car looks an insult; it has to be dropped. A new car is needed. By the time you reach the forty thousand line, the horizon has gone further away - it demands eighty thousand. It goes on doubling. The distance remains the same.

Between the desire and the fulfillment, the distance remains the same. It never changes, not even for a single inch. The beggar and the emperor are always in the same plight. If you look at the distance between their desire and fulfillment, you will see they are sailing in the same boat.

Once understood, desire drops by itself, on its own accord. Not that you drop it ( so the question of “how” never arises. And when desire drops, there is desirelessness. Not that you have to make efforts for it to be there; not that you have to work hard to gain desirelessness; it is not a goal. When desires disappear.the absence of desire is desirelessness.

Let me say it in another way. Ordinarily whenever the word desirelessness is used, you think it is against desire. It is not. Desirelessness is not the opposite of desire. Desirelessness is simply the absence of desire, not the opposite. If it is the opposite then it can become the goal. It is not the opposite. You cannot make a goal out of it.

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