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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol. 6
 

Chapter 4: This Too Will Pass

Have you tried it? Just put a mirror before a very small child. He will look in the mirror very surprised, with wide open eyes he will look: “Who is this fellow?” He will try to catch hold, but he cannot catch hold of the person. And then, if the child is intelligent, he will try to go to the back of the mirror: “Maybe the child is hiding behind the mirror.” He is not yet aware that it is only a mirror, there is no reality.

Mind is only a mirror: it reflects the clouds of the world; it reflects all that happens around in the world. Somebody insults and there is anger - it is a reflection. Somebody beautiful passes by and it reflects - it is lust. And you immediately become identified with it.

Keep a little distance and slowly, slowly you will find that the distance goes on growing. One day the mind is so far, far away, it does not affect you at all. This is coming home, this is buddhahood. Aes dhammo sanantano: this is the inexhaustible law of life. If you can be a witness you will be able to pass through a great transformation. You will know your real self.

The old maid sat stroking the head of her pet tomcat and worrying about what she had missed all her life, when all at once, a fairy appeared with her wand and told the old maid she was ready to give her any three wishes she might make. The fairy asked that she not get excited but take her time and decide on her wants carefully.

Her first wish was that she might have a beautiful body. The wand was waved and her wish granted. When she examined the result in the mirror, her second wish was immediate: that she be given clothing to drape this wonderful figure. Her wish was again fulfilled with racks of beautiful clothes made to fit perfectly.

When asked for the third wish, she said she wanted a man.

Said the fairy, “You have a beautiful cat there. How about making a man out of him for you?”

That was entirely agreeable, and the tomcat became a man. The old maid was very happy. When asked if she were entirely satisfied, she said she was. Then the fairy asked the man if he were entirely satisfied. “Yes,” said he, “but she won’t be.”

“Why?”

“She forgot about that trip to the veterinarian!”

You go on doing things, unaware of what you are doing. You go on asking for things, unaware what you are asking for. If all your desires are fulfilled you will be the most miserable man in the world; it is good that they are not fulfilled.

The really religious person never asks anything from existence. He says, “Thy will be done, thy kingdom come. Because what can I ask out of my unawareness? Whatsoever I ask is going to be wrong.” He asks only one thing: “Thy will be done.”

Be meditative, be prayerful. Remember these two sutras: “This too will pass away” - that will help you to meditate - and the second sutra, “Thy will be done”; that will help you to be prayerful. And when meditation and prayerfulness meet, you are at the highest peak of consciousness possible.