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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Beloved, Vol.1
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Chapter 8: Dissolve Yourself

If you know only the body you are going to be very poor. First, you will always be afraid of death, and one who is afraid to die will be afraid to live - because life and death are so together that if you are afraid to die you will become afraid to live.

It is life that brings death, so if you are afraid of death, how can you really love life? The fear will be there. It is life that brings death; you cannot live it totally. If death ends everything, if that is your idea and understanding, then your life will be a life of rushing and chasing. Because death is coming, you cannot be patient. Hence the American mania for speed: everything has to be done fast because death is approaching, so try to manage as many more things as possible before you die. Try to stuff your being with as many experiences as possible before you die because once you are dead, you are dead.

This creates a great meaninglessness and, of course, anguish, anxiety. If there is nothing which is going to survive the body, then whatsoever you do cannot be very deep. Then whatsoever you do cannot satisfy you. If death is the end and nothing survives, then life cannot have any meaning and significance. Then it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

The Baul knows that he is in the body, but he is not the body. He loves the body; it is his abode, his house, his home. He is not against the body because it is foolish to be against your own home, but he is not a materialist. He is earthly, but not a materialist. He is very realistic, but not a materialist. He knows that dying, nothing dies. Death comes but life continues.

I have heard:

The funeral service was over and Desmond, the undertaker, found himself standing beside an elderly gent.

“One of the relatives?” asked the mortician.

“Yes, I am,” answered the senior citizen.

“How old are you?”

“Ninety-four.”

“Hmm,” said Desmond, “hardly pays you to make the trip home.”

The whole idea is of bodily life: if you are ninety-four, finished. Then it hardly pays to go back home - then better to die. What is the point of going back? - you will have to come again. It hardly pays.if death is the only reality, then whether you are ninety-four or twenty-four, how much difference does it make? Then the difference is of only a few years. Then the very young start feeling old, and the child starts feeling already dead. Once you understand that this body is the only life, then what is the point of it all? Then why carry it on?

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