Quantcast

View Book

 
 
OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   Just Like That
 

Chapter 6: Blind Man’s Bluff

Buddha said, “You don’t understand. They are like me. It is because of compassion that they say, ‘Just two miles,’ so you get courage. And you say, ‘Okay, so just two miles? Let two miles be passed.’ They help you. If they say, ‘It is a hundred miles,’ you will drop dead. You will be flat on the earth. You will lose courage.”

A master cannot do it for you. He cannot pass through the misery, through the chaos. If he could he would have done it, but that is not possible in the nature of things. But he can help you, he can give you courage, he can say, “Come on, just a little more, and the night will pass. And when the night is the darkest the morning is nearest.” He will give you courage, and that is needed.

That’s why without a master it is almost impossible to travel on the path, because who will help give you courage? Who will say, “Just two miles more.”? Who will say that you are almost at the end of the journey, you have almost reached, just a little bit more.? And as Lao Tzu says, a thousand-league journey is completed by taking only one step at a time. You take one step, then another, then another, and a thousand-mile journey is completed.

Chaos is going to be there. When you enter inside, all diseases that you have suppressed will erupt to the surface. All the miseries that you have been avoiding - they are waiting for you there, restlessly waiting for you. They will surface. You will pass through hell. But nobody ever reaches heaven if he is not ready to pass through hell. Hell is the gateway. Hell is the way, heaven is the journey’s end. But one has to pass through the hell. Through a dark night one has to pass to come to the morning. And you will have to encounter it.

Man is ignorant, and he resists any effort to break his ignorance because he is afraid a chaos is waiting. And you rightly suspect, the chaos is there. You will almost go mad. A master will be needed who can hold your hand while you are going mad, and take you out of the madness.

These are the implications. That’s why the mind goes on playing games with you. It says, “Yes, tomorrow I am going to meditate.” But it is afraid. Meditation is like death. And it is. You will have to die as you are; only then the new can be born.

This is a small story by Sheik Saadi, one of the great Sufi mystic poets. A very simple anecdote, but carrying much meaning. And all those who have known, they talk in the simplest words possible.because the truth itself is so complex. Why make it more complex by complex words and theories? The truth is itself so difficult to reach, why make the journey more difficult? They talk in parables, so that even a child can understand - and as far as that ultimate is concerned, everybody is a child, ignorant, playing with toys and wasting life.

Said Sheik Saadi:

“A man had an ugly daughter. He married her to a blind man because nobody else would have her.”