Quantcast

View Book

 
 
OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Sun Rises in the Evening
« < 2 3 4 5 6 > »
 

Chapter 3: Cutting off the Root

Leo Tolstoy had gone for a morning walk with Chekhov. They came across a beautiful horse in the woods, and Tolstoy started talking about the horse. And he talked in such a way that Chekhov could not believe it. He said, “What are you saying? You are talking as if you know the very inside of the horse!” - because Tolstoy was talking about, “this morning, these birds, these trees, this sun, this sky, these clouds.” and how the horse was feeling about the clouds, and how he was feeling about the trees and the smell of the wet earth; how the horse was feeling about the grass and the flowers and the sun. And he was saying it as if it were directly from the horse’s mouth. Chekhov himself was a great artist, a great novelist, a great genius, but he had never visualized how the horse would feel. And Tolstoy was saying it so deeply, profoundly, that he said, “Leo Tolstoy, I feel as if you have once been a horse in your past life!” Tolstoy started laughing, and said, “No, but the day I came across my own inside, I came across everybody’s inside. Before that, I knew myself as the body - I knew myself as if from the outside.”

Have you any acquaintance with yourself from the inside, or do you only know that which the mirror says about you? That is as if you were standing outside yourself and looking from there. You know all that people say about you. Somebody says that you are beautiful, and you think you are beautiful; and somebody says that you are ugly, and you start feeling miserable; and somebody says that you are intelligent, and you are flying high; and somebody says that you are stupid, and you are shattered. Again, this is nothing but a mirror: others’ opinions cannot be more than mirrors. But have you never seen yourself from the inside? And there you are; there you have always been, you are abiding there. And if you cannot know this space that you are abiding in, how can you know the inner reality of a tree or a mountain or a star? And how can you know the inner reality of the totality?

Godliness is the inside of totality. But to enter into it, one has to enter within one’s own door.

Truth is within ourselves; it takes no rise
From outward things, whate’er you may believe.
There is an inmost center in us all,
Where truth abides in fullness.

True, absolutely true. And sometimes it happens that poets come very close to the mystics. Poetry comes closer to religion than anything else. Poetry is a glimpse into truth; mysticism is living there. Poetry is like the Himalayas seen from far away, those sunlit peaks, those virgin snows; religion is living there as those sunlit peaks, as that virgin snow. Poetry is a distant vision of truth; mysticism, or religion, is becoming one with it, knowing it as one’s innermost center. But poetry comes closest.

“Where truth abides in fullness.” Nothing is lacking in you, nothing has to be added to you. You are born perfect, because you are born of perfection. You are perfect, because the perfect is breathing in you, living in you. You are an extension of perfection. If existence is perfect, then nothing can be imperfect, because all is its expression. How can it be imperfect? So, there is no need to seek perfection, there is no need to improve upon yourself. All that is needed is to know who you are, and in that very knowing one comes to feel the completion, the perfection. One has not to become perfect, one already is. And because we are trying to become perfect we are becoming more and more ridiculous.

« < 2 3 4 5 6 > »