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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol. 6
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Chapter 8: Everything Is Possible

In the same situation you can’t think of Buddha looking at the sky because for Buddha there is no God outside. God is within, you are looking at an empty sky, there is no one to respond. God is in the crucified person, there is no way to pray to God. Prayer is absolutely meaningless for a Buddha; he would have accepted the crucifixion without any grudge, without any complaint, without any anger. He is suprahuman, his expression is absolutely suprahuman; not for a single moment will he allow human weakness to enter in.

When he was dying, he stopped his disciples from weeping and crying; he said, “You can do it when I am gone, you will have enough time then, but right now, at least while I am still alive, don’t do such a stupid thing. There is nothing to weep about because there is nobody to die. Why are you weeping?”

Ananda, his disciple, said, “Bhagwan, we have loved you so much, how can we avoid feeling sad?”

Buddha said, “You loved a nothingness. I was never a person but only a presence, and I have been telling you again and again, don’t think of me as a person. The person died the day I became Buddha. Gautama Siddhartha died the day enlightenment happened. Since then there has been nobody inside the house, the house is utterly empty; hence nobody is dying, stop crying and weeping. Later on when I am gone you can do whatsoever you want, you will have enough time. Don’t waste these precious moments in weeping.” This is a totally different expression. Existence is multidimensional. When it is experienced there are going to be many expressions of it.

Mahavira is absolutely indifferent to everything. He will not laugh, he will not weep either, because for him this whole world is nothing but a dream. If you know that something is a dream, how can you weep?

There is an ancient Chinese parable:

Chuang Tzu used to tell this parable again and again. A great king had only one son and the son was dying of a disease for which there was no medicine available. All the physicians had said, “There is no way to save him. It is only a question of a few hours or at the most one or two days and he will be gone.”

The king loved the son so much. He was his only son; the king was getting old and there was no possibility of another son. The king was sitting by the side of the bed the whole night because this might be his son’s last night.

Nearabout four o’clock the old king fell asleep and had a dream. In the dream he saw a beautiful marble palace; he had never dreamed of such a beautiful palace. And the kingdom was so vast; he was the king, and he was sitting on a golden throne studded with big diamonds and emeralds. He had emeralds and diamonds but not this big, not this pure, without any flaw. And he had beautiful women and twelve sons; maybe the idea of losing his only son had created the desire for twelve sons, maybe it was just a reflection of his actual state. This dream might have been just wish fulfillment, but he felt so blessed. And all his sons were so wise, so healthy, such great warriors.

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