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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol. 9
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Chapter 5: The Risk Is Worth Taking

If the traveler can find
a virtuous and wise companion,
let him go with him joyfully
and overcome the dangers of the way.

But if you cannot find
friend or master to go with you,
travel on alone -
like a king who has given away his kingdom,
like an elephant in the forest.

Travel on alone,
rather than with a fool for company.

Do not carry with you your mistakes.
Do not carry your cares.

Travel on alone
like an elephant in the forest.

Nirupa says that this is my serious day. The fault is not mine; the whole fault is Gautama the Buddha’s. That old guy is absolutely serious.

It is said of Jesus that he never laughed. That can’t be true because Jesus is very much a man of the earth, very earthly. It is impossible that he never laughed. He loved people, he loved mixing with people, with ordinary people - farmers, carpenters, fishermen, gamblers, drunkards, prostitutes. Seeing his company, it seems absolutely improbable that he never laughed. He enjoyed eating, drinking; he enjoyed company. He must have gossiped, joked, laughed.

But it is possible that Buddha never laughed. He is utterly serious. He is very much Indian. He is pure water.. I mix as much wine as I can!

So Nirupa, forgive me, because if I mix more wine, then that old guy will be really angry! As it is, he already thinks I am corrupting him, but he can’t do anything - I am alive and he is dead! I am not an Indian at all.

Once an American lady was asking me, “What ‘nese’ are you? - Japanese, Chinese, Javanese?”

I told her, “I am no one.” And then I asked her, “Who are you? - monkey, donkey or Yankee?”

I belong to no country, to no tradition, to no race, to no religion. I am just a white cloud floating all over the world. I don’t have any roots anywhere; hence I am free. Buddha has roots in the Indian soil, in the Indian mind.

Buddha would have remained the same, unavailable, unapproachable. It is through the Chinese and the Japanese that he became a little more human. Otherwise he would have remained a god above the clouds, almost unreachable. When Buddhism was introduced into China they brought it down to the earth. Chinese are very down-to-earth people. They have never given birth to any men like Buddha. They had their own awakened people - Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Lieh Tzu - but they are full of laughter, full of joy, full of gratitude. They belong to this existence; they are not in any way escaping from it. They are living it in its totality.

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