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Chapter 7: Thanks for the Compliment!

Existence is a mystery. Mathematics is incapable of understanding it; mind is utterly impotent in understanding it, because mind knows only one way. The Aristotelian way is the mind’s way. And anybody who knows life knows that Aristotle has been a calamity, the greatest that has ever existed in the world. And he is the father of modern philosophy, the father of modern science. But there are revolts against him. Mystics have always been revolting, now physicists are revolting.

According to Aristotle there is no mystery; everything is explainable in logical terms - that is his fundamental tenet. And my fundamental tenet is: nothing is explainable in terms of logic. If you try to explain life in terms of logic you destroy life.

It is as if to explain the beauty of a rose you take the rose to the chemist to dissect it, to analyze it, and to find out where the beauty is. The chemist is capable of analyzing the rose, but he will find only chemicals, not beauty. Beauty will evaporate. Beauty was in the paradox of the rose. It should not be according to logic - hence logic is very blind.

Your problem is that you suffer from “Aristotelitis.” It is one of the most deep-rooted diseases.

You say: “I know that you love contradictions.” It is not so that I love contradictions. What can I do? Contradictions are there. If I have to be true to the totality of existence I have to love them, otherwise something will have to be denied. And the moment you deny something you miss something immensely valuable, and the denial will never allow you to know the whole. And only the whole is true; the parts are only parts. They have some meaning only in the context of the whole; in themselves they are meaningless.

That’s why science has created great meaninglessness in the world. It was bound to happen; it is a by-product of scientific methodology. Science tries to explain everything cleanly, with no vagueness; it wants to reduce everything to clear-cut categories. And it has succeeded, but in its success man and his spirit has failed.

The success of science is rooted in Aristotle, but man’s failure - the failure of his joy, the failure of his love, the failure of his capacity to sing, dance and celebrate - is also rooted in Aristotle. But there are clear-cut signs of revolt, particularly within these last thirty, forty years - many great scientists have revolted against Aristotle. The first one to revolt was Albert Einstein.

Aristotle is very absolutistic: A is absolutely A and never B, man is absolutely man and never a woman. He believes in the absolutes, and Einstein brought the idea of relativity. He said absolutes don’t exist; there are only relative things. A man is relatively more a man than a woman and a woman is relatively more a woman than a man, but the question is not one of absolute distinction - they overlap. And you may be a man in the morning and you may not be a man by the evening; you may be a woman in the evening and you may not be a woman by the morning. You are not one-sided, you have many sides.

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