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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol. 9
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Chapter 8: The Nature of Things

The teacher was even more angry. He phoned the Minister of Education and said, “I asked a boy in class who knocked down the walls of Jericho and he said it wasn’t him. I then went to the headmaster to complain. He said he had known the family for years and if the boy said it wasn’t him, it wasn’t him. What do you think about that?”

The minister was silent for a second, then said, “Listen, I am fed up with complaints from your school. Get the walls repaired and if there are more complaints, I am going to shut that school down!”

Information is not bad in itself - you have to know who knocked down the walls of Jericho! But if information becomes so powerful in your mind that it goes on and on and you cannot put it off, you cannot put the mind in a state of relaxation, then the mind becomes wearied, tired, bored, exhausted. In that state, how can you be intelligent? Your energies are dissipated. Intelligence needs overflowing energies. Intelligence needs health, wholeness.

A meditator will be more intelligent than anybody else and a meditator will be able to use his mind objectively and subjectively both. He will be able to move outside as easily as he will be able to move inside. He will be more flexible. He is the master. He can take the car forward, he can take the car backward.

When Ford had made his first car there was no reverse gear in it. It was a difficult problem to come back home. You had to go round, you had to take the long route, just to come back home. Even if you had gone a few yards past your garage you could not come back to the garage - there was no reverse gear in it. Later on it was added.

Meditation gives you the reverse gear. Ordinarily you don’t have it and you have to go round the world again and again, and still you cannot find where your home is; you cannot come back. You cannot go in; you know only how to go out. You cannot back in. A meditator becomes more fluid, more flexible. He becomes more enriched.

I am not in favor of those people who in the past, in the name of religion, became fixated into their introversion; that is another extreme. A few people are fixated as extroverts; as a reaction, a few other people become fixated as introverts. Both become dead. Life belongs to the flexible one who can move from extroversion to introversion and from introversion to extroversion as easily as you move outside your house and inside your house. When it is too cold inside you come out in the sun; when it becomes too hot you come inside under the shelter, in the coolness of the house - and there is no problem. It is as simple as that.

Meditation does not mean going against the outside world. It has been so in the past. That’s why religion has failed, it could not succeed; it could not have succeeded in any way. Life belongs to the fluid, to the flowing. Whenever you become fixated you become a thing. Your monks were introverts; they closed their eyes to the outside world.

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