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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   Tao: The Golden Gate, Vol. 2
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Chapter 9: Save Me from the Pillar!

Education is a necessity, unavoidable; mind is a necessity, unavoidable. But there comes a moment in your life when something higher than the mind is needed, when you need to transcend the mind, when you go beyond it. That is the whole process of meditation.

Listening to me through the mind is bound to create more problems for you rather than solving them, because whatsoever I say will be heard with so many prejudices that by the time it reaches to you it is no more the thing that was said.

A little boy and his father are in front of the lion’s cage at the zoo. Suddenly the little boy comes too close to the cage and the lion is almost on the boy.

A man standing by with a swift movement grabs the boy and saves him.

A journalist happens to be among the crowd, so he decides to write an article about it. Among other questions he asks the man, “What party do you belong to?”

“I am a Nazi,” replies the man.

The next day the newspaper carries the following headline: “A dirty Nazi snatches the lunch of a hungry African immigrant.”

That’s the way how prejudices function. Prejudices create immediate interpretations in you, and they are so quick, they don’t give you any time to ponder over. You understand only that which you can understand, but that is not understanding at all; you are moving in circles.

What I am saying to you is something that you have never known before, is something absolutely unknown to you. It is something mysterious; you cannot figure it out by your own calculations. You have to be more aware so that your prejudices don’t interfere, so that your old ideas don’t come in, otherwise you will immediately jump upon conclusions.

And mind is very stupid, it is never intelligent. Mind is never original - it cannot be by its very nature - it only goes on and on repeating the old junk that it knows already; it cannot see anything new. If you come across something absolutely new you will simply miss it; you will not be able to see it or you will see something which is not there at all.

Gilliardi arrived in the United States and after a few weeks found he had great need of a woman. He tried flirting with a few at a nearby bar but was unsuccessful because he spoke very little English. Finally one night he picked up a streetwalker and she took him to her apartment. They were in bed making violent love when suddenly Gilliardi realized that he had not spoken a single word to her.

“Miss-a,” he said, “I come-a from-a the other side.”

“Oh?” said the girl. “This I gotta see!”

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