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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Ultimate Alchemy, Vol. 1
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Chapter 13: The Fragrance of Awareness

The this is very near; That is far away. This is known by our senses, intellect, mind. We already know it. Our knowledge, our mind, has a focus. The realm upon which this focus falls is this; the beyond is That. The Indian yogis have not even called it God, because once you use such words - God, soul, nirvana, moksha - it seems as if that unknown has become known to you. The word That shows that the unknown is still unknown. You feel it, but yet you cannot express it. Somewhere it penetrates you, but still you cannot say, “It has become my knowledge, my experience.”

Whenever someone says, “God has become my experience,” it means that he has transcended God, because that which you know has become smaller than you. Your experience can never be greater than you. Your experience is in your hand. It is something you have; it is your possession. But God can never be possessed, truth can never be possessed - it is never in your hand. It is not something which has become a memory, it is not something you are finished with, so it is not something you can define.

You can only define a thing when you have known it totally. Then you can define and believe it. Then you can say, “This is this.” But God remains indefinable. The moment never comes when you can say, “I have known.” God never becomes an experience in this sense. It is an explosion, but it is not an experience. It is a knowing, but it is never knowledge. Remember the difference. A knowing is a growing thing; it goes on growing. Knowledge is a dead stop. When you say, “I know,” you have stopped. Now there will be no growth, now there will be no flow, now there will be no unknown dimensions, now you will not be a river-like living experience.

Knowing means flowing - a river-like existence. You know, but not as knowledge; not as something finished, complete, dead in your hand. You know as an opening, a constant opening to the greater, a constant opening to the sea, a constant opening to the transcending. Knowing is a constant opening, knowledge is a closing. So those who have felt that knowledge becomes dead have not called that experience God, they have not given any name to it. Any name means knowledge. When you can give a name to a certain experience it means you have known it totally, completely. Now you can encircle it. Now you can give it a word. A word means a limitation. So the Indian wisdom says: he is That. That is not a word - it is an indication.

Ludwig Wittgenstein has said somewhere that there are certain things which cannot be said but which can be shown. You cannot say, but you can show, you can indicate. This word That is an indication. It is just a finger pointing to the beyond. It is not a word; it gives no negation. It doesn’t show that you have known - it shows that you have felt.

Knowledge has a limitation, but feeling is unlimited. When we say That, we say many more things. One: it is far away. This means near, here. We know it, it is in our capacity to know it. That means far away, very far away. In one sense, That is very far away; in another sense it is nearer than the near - but it depends from where you start. We are sitting here. The nearest point is just where you are sitting, anything compared to it is away from you. But you can go and travel the whole earth and can come back to your own point - then it will be the most distant point. So it depends.

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