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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   The Sun Rises in the Evening
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Chapter 7: The Essence Is at Ease

In the East you will find people who have experienced kundalini rising in them, great light exploding as if thousands and thousands of suns have suddenly risen on the horizon. You will find people who have seen lotuses blooming inside. And to the Western mind it looks all nonsense. The Western mind has developed technology, science - objectivity. It lives in the first, the waking state. The visionary is rejected. In the West the visionary is a marginal phenomenon; he exists only on the outskirts of civilization. He is at most tolerated - he is harmless, he can be tolerated. But he has no roots in the culture at large, he is not the main current. In the East the scientist lives in the same way - on the margin. He is not the main current. He can be tolerated, he can be used - but the respect goes to the visionary, to the dreamer, to the poet who dreams great dreams.

These are the two ordinary states. The third state happens to both, but you cannot catch hold of it - the mind dissolves. In sushupti, in dreamless sleep, you disappear as an ego, and you disappear so utterly that you cannot even remember in the morning what happened. You can remember your dreams, you cannot remember your dreamless sleep, at most it can be remembered as gaps. You can say, “I slept so deeply that there were not even dreams.” But that is guesswork; there is no direct experience of sushupti.

No culture has evolved out of sushupti because there is no possibility to directly catch hold of it. But that is the deepest ordinary state of mind. It is out of sushupti, dreamless sleep, that you get rejuvenated every day. You go to the source, you move to the source, you are again in contact with the primal consciousness, you are again in contact with your ground. You are no more human, you are no more Hindu, no more Christian; you are no more a man or a woman, black or white, you are no more Eastern, Western - all disappears, all distinctions. You are, but there is no identity. That’s why out of dreamless sleep great peace is felt.

If you move into deeper meditation, you will come to the third state where one can become aware of dreamless sleep too. And many have stopped there because it is so blissful. Many religions have stopped there. They don’t go beyond it.

There is a fourth state also, and until you reach to the fourth, go on remembering that the third is very alluring, the third is very beautiful, very blissful, but still you have not arrived home.. The fourth is home. The Eastern mystics have called it turiya; turiya means the fourth.

Waking is objective, outer; it is a kind of concentration. Dreaming is between the outer and the inner, a link between waking and deep sleep, and deep sleep is the inner. Then what is the fourth, turiya? It is both and neither. It is both inner and outer, and because it is both, that’s why it is neither. It transcends both, it is non-dual, it is total. Now nothing is outer, nothing is inner. Objects disappear and simultaneously the subject too; there is no experience and no experiencer. This fourth state is called samadhi, satori. And the beauty of the fourth is that you can live in the world and yet be not of it.

Zen believes in the fourth. Those who believe in the third have to leave the world, they have to go to the Himalayan caves; only there is it possible that they can fall into continuous deep dreamless sleep. It is falling into a beautiful coma. Its spiritual worth is nothing - although there is no misery, no anxiety because the mind is put aside. But it is a state of coma, it is escapist. And the man has not known yet what the truth is. He has chosen one thing: escaping.

The Western mind moves deeper and deeper into the world, into activity, and the Eastern mind moves out of activity, more and more out of the world.

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