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Chapter 6: Taming the Bull

5. Taming the Bull
The whip and rope are necessary,
else he might stray off down some dusty road.
Being well trained, he becomes naturally gentle.
Then, unfettered, he obeys his master.

Comment:
When one thought arises, another thought follows. When the first thought springs from enlightenment, all subsequent thoughts are true. Through delusion, one makes everything untrue. Delusion is not caused by objectivity; it is the result of subjectivity. Hold the nose ring tight and do not allow even a doubt.

6. Riding the Bull Home
Mounting the bull, slowly I return homeward.
The voice of my flute intones through the evening.
Measuring with hand-beats the pulsating harmony, I direct the endless rhythm.
Whoever hears this melody will join me.

Comment:
This struggle is over; gain and loss are assimilated. I sing the song of the village woodsman, and play the tunes of the children. Astride the bull, I observe the clouds above. Onward I go, no matter who may wish to call me back.

Truth liberates, and nothing else. Everything else creates a bondage, a burden. And truth cannot be found by intellectual effort, because truth is not a theory, it is an experience. To know it you have to live it - and that is where millions of people go wrong. They think that if they can cling to a belief, clinging will help them to find the truth. By and by they settle with the belief, and belief is not truth. It is a theory about truth: as if somebody has settled just by words, scriptures, doctrines, dogmas; as if a blind man has started believing that light exists, or a hungry man reads a book on cooking, believes this way, that way, but all the time he remains hungry. That is not the way to satisfy hunger.

Truth is a food. One has to digest it, assimilate it; one has to allow it to circulate into one’s blood, beat into one’s heart. Truth has to be assimilated into your organic unity. Belief is never assimilated, it remains an unrelated phenomenon.

You may be a Hindu, but Hinduism remains just an intellectual concept. You may be a Christian, or a Mohammedan, but they are not organic parts of your being. Deep down, the doubt continues.

I have heard one story:

Titov, the Russian cosmonaut, returned from space and was asked by Nikita Khrushchev privately whether he had seen anyone there. The story goes that he replied, “Yes, I really did see God,” to which Khrushchev answered: “I know that already, but you know our policy, so please don’t tell anybody.”

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