Quantcast

View Book

 
 
OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   From Misery to Enlightenment
 

Chapter 28: AIDS: Disease of the Existential Orphan

The principal from the very first day wanted me to go back. I said, “I am not going back. And it is not your business: if the minister of education has appointed me here, let him realize his mistake when he realizes it. For the time being why shouldn’t I enjoy it? And remember perfectly well that he is my friend. If you try to create any trouble for me, instead of my transfer, your transfer will happen.”

He phoned - his clerk told me that he phoned - the clerk of the education minister and asked, “Are these two people friends?”

He said, “They are friends. You could have understood it immediately because never before has the order been given directly to the person.” The order has to go by post to the person, and the original has to go by post to the institute. Unless the institute receives the order the person cannot come and say, ‘I have got the order.’

I brought both orders with me. I had told the education minister, “What nonsense! - by post it will take six days.” And sometimes in India you never know..

I told him, “I know a case: between Jabalpur and Katni - eighty miles.the letter took thirty-six years to travel eighty miles. Both the persons died - the one who wrote and the one to whom the letter was written. After thirty years the letter was returned stating, ‘the man is dead.’ But when it reached there the postman wrote on it, ‘There is nobody to receive it - the man is dead.’ It was published in all the newspapers about that great journey, eighty miles! If the envelope had just walked on feet, it would have reached long ago. Thirty-six years!”

So I said, “Don’t waste time, just give me both the orders. And you can believe your post office, your postman, but you can’t believe me?”

He said, “No, this is not a question of belief - just bureaucracy.”

I said, “Don’t mention bureaucracy. I am here; you give me both orders.” In fact, I took both orders from his table and I told him to sign; he had to sign. That’s how the mistake happened, because if it had gone through the bureaucracy they might have found out that this man was not for this college, this man had been selected for another college; so it was just a misplacement.

The man who had been selected for this college reached the place I was meant to go to. He asked me, “What should be done?”

I said, “You enjoy it there, I will enjoy it here. Till they find it out themselves you need not inform anybody. You just keep quiet, it has nothing to do with you. The government sends you - let the government find it out.” It took them six months; just such a small thing.six months. But it was impossible for me then to prolong my postponement so I told the man to come. He was a nice fellow: after two years I visited once, and he had kept my servant and his wife more respectfully than I had. And they were so happy, there was no question.

I asked her, “Has paralysis happened any time?”

She said, “No, no, paralysis, not at all. For these two years I have not even had a common cold. No sickness has happened.”

AIDS to me is an existential sickness, that’s why the medical profession is going to be in tremendous difficulty unless they try to understand the very root. And for that, medicine will not help; only meditation can help.