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Chapter 9: Truth Simply Is

Now the question is: is what I am saying just a repetition of Buddha? If I had not gone to the sea, and just reading scriptures I would have repeated like a parrot that the taste of the sea is salty because Buddha says it so - and I trust him, he must be saying what is right; who bothers to go to the ocean? When Buddha has said so, it is finished, it is decisive forever - then it would have been a repetition.

But I went to the sea; I tasted the sea and I found that it is salty. Now what should I do? Just because Buddha has also said it is salty, should I not say it is salty because people will think it is a repetition? But then I would be lying! Should I say that it is sweet? But then it would be untrue. I have to be truthful, so I have to say two things: one, that I have tasted it myself, and the second, that now I am a witness that Buddha was right. I am not saying it on Buddha’s authority, I am saying it on my own authority. In fact, I am giving Buddha a witness, an eye-witness, that whatsoever he had said twenty-five centuries ago was true, was right. I know it through my own experience.

That’s what Bahauddin was doing. Now this man says.He thought that he was clever, and clever people, or at least the people who think they are clever, are almost always stupid people. Only stupid people have the idea that they are clever.

A real intelligent person is not clever. When you have intelligence, what need do you have of being clever? Your very life shows your intelligence. The clever person is trying to show that he is intelligent, and only one who is not intelligent tries to show that he is intelligent. Remember it! Only the ugly person tries to show that he is beautiful, and only the ignorant tries to show his knowledge.

The man who knows never tries to show. It is seen by others; it happens on its own accord. When the spring comes and trees bloom, they are not advertising, “Come and see.” But their perfume spreads to the winds; people start coming. And if people don’t come - because people are so blind, they have lost all sensitivity - then at least bees will come, butterflies will come, birds will come, and that is enough. But they come on their own.

When the perfume is released to the winds people start coming. There is no need to brag about the fact.

The person who is trying to be clever simply shows that he is not clever. He is afraid; if he does not show, he will be caught. If he does not show his knowledge, he will be caught: people may come to know that he is ignorant. Before they come to know he has to make much noise.

Morarji Desai was interviewed on the BBC a few days ago and the interviewer asked a very relevant question, significant too: “You talk so much of morality - why don’t you lead your country morally?”

Morarji Desai said in anger, “Then what am I doing? I am leading my country politically and morally, both. Do you mean to say that I should leave my prime ministership and lead the country only morally? Do you think yourself very smart? Nobody has asked this question of me. Do you think that you are very smart?”