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Chapter 9: The Pause between Two Notes

In India we have three gods - trimurti, the Indian trinity - three faces of one god: Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva. Brahma is the god who created the world, Vishnu is the god who maintains the world, and Shiva is the god who will destroy the world. Now, you will be surprised. There is not a single temple dedicated to Brahma, the god who created the world. Who bothers? - once you have already created your work is finished. You will not find a single temple dedicated to Brahma. Yes, there is only one temple - very rare, somewhere in India - but it is impossible to find. Thousands and thousands of temples are there - in one town you can find hundreds of temples, but not a single temple dedicated to Brahma, who has created the world. What type of gratitude is this? But who bothers about life? - it has already happened. Birth is not the question.

You will find Shiva worshipped everywhere; the most worshipped god is Shiva. Millions of temples are dedicated to Shiva: he is the god of death. Number two is Vishnu, who maintains life. People worship Vishnu; but even people who worship Vishnu, when they are in danger they immediately run to Shiva’s temple - because he is the ultimate god. Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva: three are the gods. Shiva is called “the great god” - mahadeva; the other two are lesser gods. Death predominates.

I am the pause between the two notes
that fall into a real accordance scarce at all
for death’s note tends to dominate.
Both though are reconciled
in the dark interval tremblingly.

And that dark interval is love - where death and life meet, where death and life embrace each other, where life and death have a love affair, where life and death come to an orgasm. Hence, there is tremendous attraction in love, because it is life.and fear also, because it is death too. When you make love to a woman or a man, you never go totally into it. You go so far, because it is life - then you start hesitating, then you don’t go any further, because then death is also there. It is the pause between the two notes, and it is dark - the dark interval between the two.

Why does Rilke call it dark? Love is dark. It is not just a coincidence that people have chosen the night to make love - it is not just coincidence: there is some affinity between darkness and love. Making love in the bright light looks a little rude, vulgar, ugly. Making love in the marketplace where others can watch is just insane. One needs privacy - and darkness gives you absolute privacy, because in the darkness you cannot see the beloved, the beloved cannot see you. You are absolutely alone; the other is not any interference.

Love has a quality of darkness in it, because it has depth. Darkness is always deep, light is shallow. Remember, howsoever much light is there, light is always shallow. Look: the day is shallow - night is so deep, infinite. Love is like the dark.deep rest.falling into tremendous depth. Death is also dark: all over the world, death has been painted as dark. Love is dark, death is also dark - there is an affinity between love and death too.

Many people come to me and they say, “Why are we so much afraid of love? Why? We hanker for it, and yet we are afraid, and when the opportunity arises we are stuck; we cannot let go.” Because love is half death and half life - that is the dilemma. It is “the pause between two notes.”

Both though are reconciled
in the dark interval tremblingly.

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