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OSHO Online Library   »   The Books   »   Inner War and Peace
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Chapter 1: The Psychology of War

And then, O King,
Arjuna, whose flag bore the crest of Hanumana,
having looked at the sons of Dhritarashtra,
armed with their weapons and ready to strike,
picked up his bow
and addressed these words to Krishna.

Arjuna:
“O Infallible One,
place my chariot between the two armies,
so that I may clearly see these men
who stand here, eager to fight,
and know who are they
who will be fighting with me in this war.”

Dhritarashtra:
O Sanjay,
assembled on the field of righteousness,
the ground of the Kuru,
and desirous of war,
what did my sons and the sons of Pandu do?

Dhritarashtra is blind. But passion does not disappear with the absence of sight; desire does not disappear with the absence of sight. Had Surdas thought of Dhritarashtra, he would never have destroyed his own eyes.

Surdas destroyed his eyes believing that once his sight was gone, desire and passion would never arise in him again. But desire does not arise in the eyes, it arises out of the mind. No passion will ever be finished in this way - even if one destroys one’s own eyes.

This wonderful tale of the Gita begins with a blind man’s curiosity. In fact, not be a single tale would be told in this world if there were no blind men. All the stories of this life begin with a blind man’s curiosity. A blind man wants to see what he cannot see; a deaf person wants to hear what he cannot hear. Even if all the sense-organs were lost, the desires hidden within the mind would not vanish.

So, I would like to remind you from the very outset that Dhritarashtra is blind, and yet sitting miles away, his mind is curious, eager and troubled to know what is happening on the battlefield. Also keep a second point in mind: that the blind Dhritarashtra has one hundred sons, but that the children born of a blind person can never have any real vision even though they may have physical eyes. Those who are born of blind parents - and perhaps generally speaking people are born of blind parents - may have physical eyes, but it is difficult for them to gain inner sight. So secondly, it is important to understand that the one hundred sons of Dhritarashtra were acting blindly in every sense. They had outer, physical eyes but not inner ones. One who is blind can only beget blindness. And yet, this father is curious to know what is happening.

Thirdly, one should note what Dhritarashtra is saying:

O Sanjay,
assembled on the field of righteousness,
the ground of the Kuru,
and desirous of war.

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