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Chapter 4: Mind: An Expert Coward

The first question:

Osho,
My uncle, Pandit Satyavrata Siddhantalankar, who is eighty-two years old, is a great admirer of yours. He has come and stayed in Koregaon Park for two weeks at a stretch on two secret occasions just to listen to your discourses. Pandit Satyavrata is a noted Hindi Sanskrit scholar and has authored over seventy-five books on subjects ranging from the Upanishads to Homeopathy. He was also vice-chancellor of the Hindi Sanskrit Gurukul Kangri University at Hardwar and was a nominated Rajya Sabha M.P. for the full two terms. Today he is perhaps the best known and respected leader in the Arya Samaj.
He told me that he doesn’t know whether there is any such thing as self-realization, but if anyone is realized then he feels that you are the only person who is - far beyond J. Krishnamurti and Swami Vivekananda.
However, he cannot praise you openly as the Arya Samaj people would be upset and flabbergasted.
He loves your vegetarianism, but feels that the expression of love that happens so openly and spontaneously amongst your sannyasins amounts to non-vegetarian cannibalism.
Why, Osho, do you have so many secret admirers? At least I am courageous enough to be your open admirer, even though you chose to call me a coward. You also said that you would not initiate me into sannyas even if I asked for it. You also said that this was an agreement and you would not break it.

Ajai Krishna Lakhanpal, Pandit Satyavrata is well-known to me, but scholars are always cowardly. He is a great scholar, there is no doubt about it. In fact, reading his commentaries on the Upanishads I was amazed - amazed for the simple reason that a man who is not yet enlightened could have such a beautiful grasp of things which are beyond the intellect. He has been groping in the right direction, but because of his lack of courage he has not been able to take the jump, the quantum leap into the unknown.

The scholar lives in the mind, and the mind is always a coward. It clings to the past, to the familiar, to the known. Mind consists of the past, the familiar and the known. Mind has no experience of the present and no opening toward the future; it is utterly closed. Mind is like a seed, encapsulated, without any doors and without any windows. It is immensely afraid of the unknown. With the known it is very skillful, clever. With the known it can go on believing, “I am very superior.” With the unknown it simply becomes utterly ignorant. The moment it encounters the unknown, a great fear arises in the mind - then again all your expertise is irrelevant.

That’s why he has been coming on secret trips to Pune. He does not even come to the discourses openly, he tries to hide himself. But that’s the way of the mind.

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